Poached Chicken and Asparagus With Green Goddess Sauce


Poached Chicken and Asparagus With Green Goddess Sauce
This easy meal of tender and juicy poached chicken with asparagus and a creamy green goddess sauce is light and fresh, perfect for marking the beginning of spring. For this dish, we lightened the green goddess with whipped cream, which softens the herbaceous flavor, making it more delicate, and lends a luscious, mousse-like consistency. (If you like, make just the dressing according to the instructions in step 4, omitting the whipped cream, and serve it with sturdy lettuces for salads.)
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2ndXAAx

Japanese Mentaiko Spaghetti (Pasta With Spicy Cod Roe and Butter Sauce)


Japanese Mentaiko Spaghetti (Pasta With Spicy Cod Roe and Butter Sauce)
Mentaiko spaghetti has become a classic of the Japanese-Italian kitchen, and is popular on late-night menus as an accompaniment to heavy drinking. It’s also as easy as can be: deliciously buttery noodles, tossed with spicy cured pollack roe and strips of nori—all the flavor of the ocean, packed into an effortless bowl.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2n4uoKX

Creamy Vegan Saag Paneer (With Tofu)


Creamy Vegan Saag Paneer (With Tofu)
The wonderful thing about saag paneer—the Indian staple of greens and fresh cheese in a creamy sauce—is that, in my experience, it’s almost universally loved by vegetarians and meat-eaters alike. But what if we wanted to make a completely dairy-free version, so that vegetarians, meat-eaters, and vegans can all enjoy a meal together? This recipe recruits the power of cauliflower, a variety of greens, and marinated tofu to do just that.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2naw9I5

Vegan Southern-Style Collard Greens With Mushrooms


Vegan Southern-Style Collard Greens With Mushrooms
Classic Southern braised collards are simmered with smoked pork for a rich and meaty flavor. This vegan version re-creates all of the dish’s most important qualities—a deep, rich, and savory pot likker (broth); meaty bits (in this case, mushrooms) studded throughout; and enough fat to give the collards an unctuous richness well beyond any normal pot of boiled greens. Don’t discard those braising juices, either—sip, slurp, or sop them up.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2mSjSb0

Blueberry-Lemon Scones


Blueberry-Lemon Scones
Despite containing both coconut oil and coconut milk, these scones don’t end up with a coconutty flavor at all. Rather, these ingredients provide the same richness and tender but fluffy crumb you’d find in traditional scones made with butter and cream. Their flavor is light and lemony, with bursts of juicy blueberry under a crunchy crust of toasted sugar. Do be sure to refrigerate the dough, which mixes up a little warmer and softer than a typical scone dough made with chilled dairy ingredients. But don’t worry—that step takes only 15 minutes, which is about how long it takes to preheat an oven.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2lT2Yu3

Creole-Style Red Jambalaya With Chicken, Sausage, and Shrimp


Creole-Style Red Jambalaya With Chicken, Sausage, and Shrimp
Red Creole jambalaya is a classic of New Orleans cookery: a pot of rice loaded with meats, seafood, tomatoes, and more flavor than you’ll know what to do with. The secret to this one is in carefully orchestrated steps to deepen and build flavor, plus a trip to the oven to guarantee you don’t end up with a burnt layer of rice on the bottom of your pot.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2mnzGAG

Homemade Wheat Thins


Homemade Wheat Thins
his isn’t a recipe for any old cracker, it’s a recipe for crisp and thin whole grain crackers that taste exactly like the kind you buy at the store. My recipe hinges on using the same ingredients you find written right on the box: whole grains, oil, sugar, malt syrup, and turmeric. If you don’t have any affection for genuine Wheat Thins, you can get away with a substitution or two, but for those of you who want to make a worthy copy at home, it’s vital to use the right ingredients. Trust me, it’s worth the effort.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2m2QZ8q

Easy Pressure Cooker Pork Chile Verde


Easy Pressure Cooker Pork Chile Verde
There’s a reason that my recipe for easy green chili with chicken made in the pressure cooker is one of my most popular pressure cooker dishes. The flavor-to-work ratio is simply off the charts. Here’s the gist of it: Dump some ingredients into a pressure cooker. Turn it on and cook. Blend, season, and enjoy. No pre-searing meat, no charring vegetables, and barely any advance prep at all. Today, I’m bringing the technique to a classic pork-based chile verde, and it couldn’t be simpler.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2nfhTLb

Vegan Carbonara Pasta


Vegan Carbonara Pasta
Carbonara may be one of the most difficult recipes to vegan-ify, since every major ingredient in the sauce is off-limits. But by eating lots of the real deal and getting mighty crafty with an array of unlikely ingredients, I managed to create a vegan carbonara that captures the essence of the original like no other: It’s silky and rich, unctuous, and studded with meaty bits, with the sharp, lactic tang of Pecorino Romano (but, of course, no actual Pecorino Romano).
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2mc7Xms

Detroit-Style Pan Pizza


Detroit-Style Pan Pizza
This is not everyday pizza. It’s not every-week pizza. It might not even be every-month, if you want to live to a reasonable age. But damn, is it good pizza. So good that it’s worth a trip to Detroit just to taste it. So good that it’s worth devoting months of time, weeks of research, and dozens and dozens of experiments to developing a recipe to duplicate it at home. So that’s exactly what I did. Here’s what I found.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2luRdFH

Quick and Easy Creamy Mushroom Soup


Quick and Easy Creamy Mushroom Soup
The other I discovered some old mushrooms in the bottom of my fridge, most of them bruised and discolored. The bad news is that once mushrooms start showing discoloration or soft spots like that, they’re not really any good for roasting or salads or even pizzas, where those flaws and soft spots make them kinda unappetizing. The good news is that they’re still perfectly fine for creamy mushroom soup, where those flaws get blended away anyway. This recipe will work with pretty much any variety of mushroom I can think of, so go with whatever you like best.
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from Serious Eats: Recipes http://bit.ly/2m2Luuy