Краткая история иммерсионного театра в России


От хождения группами по особнякам XIX века до «спектакля для одного» – что такое иммерсивный театр, откуда он взялся и что будет дальше.

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Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel


Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel

Artist: Emily Wardill

Venue: Altman Siegel, San Francisco

Exhibition Title: It’s not what it looks like

Date: May 11 – July 1, 2017

Click here to view slideshow

Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel

Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel

Full gallery of video, images, press release and link available after the jump.

Video:

Emily Wardill, excerpt from I gave my love a cherry that had no stone, 2016, video, 9 min

 

Images:

Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel

Images and video courtesy of Altman Siegel, San Francisco

Press Release:

Altman Siegel is pleased to announce It’s not what it looks like, a solo exhibition by UK-based artist Emily Wardill. For her third solo show at the gallery, Wardill will transform the space into an immersive experience addressing the artist’s interest in the complex and transient relationships between images, objects and ideas. The exhibition features the U.S. premiere of the artist’s film I Gave My Love a Cherry That Had no Stone (2016), as well as interrelated relief sculptures and text-based rayograms. Wardill’s multilayered exhibition accentuates states of transition, both within the artworks themselves as well as their relationship to one another. Reconsidering the architecture of the gallery, Wardill heightens the fluid nature of the space, transmuting language into material, films into paintings and sculptures into flat walls.

Filmed in the auditorium of the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in Lisbon, I Gave My Love a Cherry That Had no Stone traces a man trailed by an unidentifiable entity as he wanders throughout the interior that looks like the past imagining the future. Wardill points to Dorothea Tanning’s painting Some Roses and their Phantoms (1952) as an influence to the film—the still life illustrates roses and a table cloth that appear to morph into unknown and otherworldly creatures; “They don’t look like roses; instead they are crystalline, crumpled-up, impossible brown geometrical riddles. Something like origami or a crashed car. And everything seems normal, but these exceptional things are there, blithe and gridded by the folds in the tablecloth.” Like the painting, Wardill’s film confronts the horror of our relationships towards objects, and is simultaneously ominous and comedic as things change shape, eyes bulge and the sound of water finds an echo in a glass coffee table that turns liquid. Looped on a large, tilted screen and hung from the ceiling, the artist transgresses a canonical method of display, making the viewer’s experience unstable and unpredictable—while emphasizing the film’s sculptural essence.

Also included in the exhibition are Wardill’s rayograms, comprised of film credits from a previous film. Grounded in the artist’s interest in words that try to become material, Wardill layers letters from the names of cast and crew to form arrangements of intersecting sounds and fragments—like concrete poetry. Framing the rayograms to feel as though they are in a developing bath, Wardill conflates our understanding of past and present as letters shift into images and back.

Working with white shirts, Wardill creates wall reliefs by casting the traditional article of clothing in resin. She is interested in their interdimensional quality—that all clothes become 3D when the body enters them—but also that the shirt (fresh from the package) resembles folded paper. Calling to mind origami, they are similar to the credits in that they explore the longing of one form to become another and are installed as reliefs as though they have pushed through or are floating upon the surface of the wall.

In conjunction with her exhibition at Altman Siegel, Wardill will screen her feature film No Trace of Accelerator on Wednesday, May 10 at The Lab, San Francisco. The screening will begin at 7:30 pm and will be followed at 9 pm with a conversation between the artist and The Lab’s Executive Director, Dena Beard. Additionally, a new publication titled Things Keep Their Secrets will be published in June by Bergen Kunsthall and Motto Publishing and features recent projects by the artist. Wardill is currently included in the Biennale de l’Image en Mouvement, Genève.

Emily Wardill lives and works in Lisbon, Portugal. Solo exhibitions include the Bergen Kunsthall, Bergen; Salzburger Kunstverein, Salzburg; La Loge, Brussels; Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen; National Gallery of Denmark, Copenhagen; The Badischer Kunstverein, Karlsruhe; the Serpentine Gallery, London; FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Rheims; De Appel, Amsterdam; MIT List Visual Arts Center, Cambridge; STANDARD, Oslo and Carlier Gebauer, Berlin. Group exhibitions include the 19th Biennale of Sydney; Tate Britain, London; Tate Modern, London; MUMOK, Vienna; The Venice Biennale; MOCA, Miami; Kunsthalle Basel; Kunstverein Stuttgart; ICA, London; OCA, Oslo and the Witte de With, Rotterdam. Wardill’s work has been included in numerous publications including Afterall, Art in America, Art Review, Artforum, Flash Art, Frieze, and The New York Times. She works currently as a professor at Malmö Art Academy

Link: Emily Wardill at Altman Siegel

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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История Джона Франчезе, самого старого гангстера Америки


Из федеральной тюрьмы штата Массачусетс вышел Джон Франчезе, правая рука босса мафиозной семьи Коломбо. В феврале старейшему заключенному в Америке исполнилось сто лет. Esquire рассказывает историю самого старого гангстера США.

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As the Sun Rises, NASA’s Global Hawk is Being Prepared for Flight


Hot summer days in Southern California’s Antelope Valley force many aircraft operations to start early in the morning before the sun rises. On a back ramp at Armstrong Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, a NASA Global Hawk goes through testing of its communication components and satellite connection links in preparation for flight. via NASA https://go.nasa.gov/2ue34fk

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Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu


Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu

Artist: Pieter Schoolwerth

Venue: Miguel Abreu, New York

Exhibition Title: Model as Painting

Date: May 21 – June 28, 2017

Click here to view slideshow

Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu

https://player.vimeo.com/video/222595266

Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu

Full gallery of images, press release, video and link available after the jump.

Video:

https://player.vimeo.com/video/222595266

Pieter Schoolwerth & Alexandra Lerman, The Casting Agent, 2017, HD Video, 6 minutes 35 seconds

 

Images:

Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu

Images and video courtesy of Miguel Abreu, New York

Press Release:

Miguel Abreu Gallery is pleased to announce the opening on Sunday, May 21st, of Model as Painting, Pieter Schoolwerth’s sixth solo exhibition at the gallery. The show will be held at both our 88 Eldridge and 36 Orchard Street locations.

One of the clear characteristics of our digital age is that in it all things, bodies even are generally suspendedfrom their material substance. This increasingly spectral state of affairs is the effect of mostly invisible forces of abstraction that can be associated with the digitization of more and more aspects of experience. We as living beings are now confronting a structural split between the substance of things and their virtual double. To speak concretely, one can point to everyday phenomena such as coffee without caffeine, or food without fat, for example, but also to money without currency, love without bodies, and soon following, to painting without painting, and art without art…

In Model as Painting, Pieter Schoolwerth attempts to reverse the above described techno-cultural trend by producing a series of ‘in the last instance’ paintings, in which the stuff of paint itself reappears at the very end only of a complex, multi-media effort to produce a figurative picture. As such, paint here is not immediately used to build up an image from the ground up, if you will, one brush stroke at a time, but rather it arrives only to mark the painting after it has been fully formed and output onto canvas. In other words, one can safely claim that painting without painting has transformed into painting with painting in the last instance – with paint having been liberated from its traditional depictive and expressive functions for the first time, and therefore having become truly equal to itself, that is existing as pure excess, or ornament.

A sequel to the artist’s exhibition of the same title at Capitain Petzel in Berlin earlier this year, this new iteration of the project continues to conflate the shallowness of digital space with the flatness of modernist painting and the individual layers of relief sculpture. Here again Schoolwerth asserts that photography, drawing, the construction of sculptural reliefs, digital image processing, printing, and, finally, painting, all contribute to propose a contemporary definition of painting.

An expanded version of The Casting Agent, a film produced in collaboration with Alexandra Lerman, plays a central role in the installation of the various works in the show. An allegory for the pictorial processes implicit in the paintings, where one of the characters plays a ‘casting agent,’ a stand-in for the artist, while the other plays a ‘model,’ who, while being photographed, casts shadows that create openings in the flat sets behind that allow the characters to transgress the screen and puncture the two-dimensional picture pla

This new ‘model’ that Schoolwerth proposes finds further physical form in his series of multi-layered relief works, representational tableaux in which figures overlap with one another, simultaneously projecting out from the surface and recessing into the constitutive layers. Initially carved by hand in foam core, and then photographed and used in the digitally processed image that precedes the moment of painting, the models are then produced again this time in wood with a CNC router to complete the layered process. These three-dimensional versions of the paintings can be said to depict, and yet reverse the compression of time and space that is intrinsic to digital communications, challenging the illusion of a ‘dematerialized’ space in favor of a materialist view that is anchored in human labor.

The Casting Agent, 2017
HD video, sound, 6:35 min. loop

Created by Pieter Schoolwerth
Directed, photographed, and edited by Alexandra Lerman
Produced by Pieter Schoolwerth and Alexandra Lerman
Performances by Patrick Sarmiento and Pieter Schoolwerth
Sound design and music by Soren Roi
Set construction by Alexander Carver
Special effects by Maria Beliaeva and Denis Chernobaiev

Pieter Schoolwerth was born in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1970. He lives and works in New York. Since receiving his BFA from the California Institute of the Arts in 1994, he has exhibited internationally with notable solo shows at Thread Waxing Space, Greene Naftali, American Fine Arts Co., Elizabeth Dee Gallery, and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York. His work has been included in group exhibitions at The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Centre Pompidou, Paris, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Anthony Reynolds Gallery, London, 303 Gallery, Gavin Brown’s enterprise, and Friedrich Petzel, New York, and is in the permanent collection of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Denver Art Museum, and the Phoenix Art Musuem. His fourth one-person exhibition at the gallery, After Troy, was followed by Shadows Past at Galerie Nathalie Obadia, Brussels in 2013. In 2014, Schoolwerth had solo shows at What Pipeline, Detroit; Gallery SKE, New Delhi, India; and a two-person exhibition with Jonathan Lasker at Galeria Marta Cervera, Madrid. His fifth one-person exhibition at Miguel Abreu Gallery, Your Vacuum Blows, which Sucks, took place in the winter 2015. In January 2017, he had his first solo exhibition at Capitain Petzel, Berlin.

From 2003 to 2013, Schoolwerth ran Wierd Records and the Wierd Party at Home Sweet Home on the LES of NYC. Wierd released music by 42 bands working in the genres of minimal electronics, coldwave and noise, and produced over 500 live music, dj, and performance art events internationally (www.wierdrecords.com).

Link: Pieter Schoolwerth at Miguel Abreu

Contemporary Art Daily is produced by Contemporary Art Group, a not-for-profit organization. We rely on our audience to help fund the publication of exhibitions that show up in this RSS feed. Please consider supporting us by making a donation today.

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